100 Random Facts about the English Language

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This is a feature containing obscure words, surprising etymologies and bizarre linguistic facts. If you are a word-buff you will find this really interesting. So, without further a do, here are 100 random facts about the English language, English words, and English etymology:

1. Bumblebees were nicknamed foggy-toddlers in 18th century England.

2. Pupaphobia is the fear of dolls and puppets.

3. Cowards have been called chickens since the 14th century.

4. A monepic sentence is one that contains a single word.

5. The distance between your thumb and the opposite side of your hand when it’s extended is called the shaftment.

6. In 16th century English, twirk (spelled with an E, not an I) meant “to twist the hairs of a moustache.”

7. The word creosote literally means “flesh-preserver.”

8. The feeling of calmness or contentedness that follows a pleasant dream is called euneirophrenia.

9. The word comet comes from a Greek word meaning “long-haired star.”

10. To dismantle originally meant “to remove a cloak.”

11. In its earliest known written record, the English alphabet had 29 letters.

12. Cluck-and-grunt was 1930s slang for ham and eggs.

13. An anepronym is a trade name that has come to be used generally in the language, like Kleenex, Jacuzzi or hoover.

14. In Elizabethan English, a clap of thunder was nicknamed a rounce-robble-hobble.

15. The word trampoline derives from an Italian word for a pair of stilts.

Read the other 85 here: http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/6272224

Embracing the Art of Editing

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Having at times been both an editor and writer I have learnt a very important lesson; editing is essential, regardless of the form of writing and it is something we need to learn to embrace. There are horror stories about bad editors who do more harm than good, so as an author it is always your job to maintain the integrity of a story or article. However, also remember good editors have just one goal in mind – to make your writing the very best it can be.

The key is not to take feedback too personally, something often easier said than done. Not all editors are gentle and sometimes they point out things you don’t want to hear, but all feedback will teach you something.

While it can be confronting to open yourself up for criticism, editors also help give you confidence in your creation by making sure the story essentials are all clear and in place. So if you’re lonely or struggling, find an editor and don’t give up.

Things to remember:

  • See feedback as an opportunity to improve
  • Don’t be precious or defensive – if you really don’t agree, don’t make the changes
  • Keep an open mind
  • Enjoy the process of sharing your work
  • Be brave

Finishing a writing project, big or small, is an achievement that should not be understated. Many writers work around day jobs, family and dozens of other life obstacles. So keep writing and embrace editing, you never know where you might end up.

Read the full article here: http://writersedit.com/embracing-art-editing/

43 Of The Most Romantic Lines From Literature

 

The members of the BuzzFeed Community tell us about their favourite romantic lines from literature. These are some of their responses:

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2. “He stepped down, trying not to look long at her, as if she were the sun, yet he saw her, like the sun, even without looking.”
—Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina

3. “Whatever our souls are made out of, his and mine are the same…If all else perished, and he remained, I should still continue to be; and if all else remained, and he were annihilated, the universe would turn to a mighty stranger.”
—Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights

4. “You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged, but one word from you will silence me on this subject for ever.”
—Jane Austen, Pride & Prejudice

5. “You and I, it’s as though we have been taught to kiss in heaven and sent down to earth together, to see if we know what we were taught.”
—Boris Pasternak, Doctor Zhivago

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7. “Perhaps, after all, romance did not come into one’s life with pomp and blare, like a gay knight riding down; perhaps it crept to one’s side like an old friend through quiet ways; perhaps it revealed itself in seeming prose, until some sudden shaft of illumination flung athwart its pages betrayed the rhythm and the music, perhaps… perhaps…love unfolded naturally out of a beautiful friendship, as a golden-hearted rose slipping from its green sheath.”
—Lucy Maud Montgomery, Anne of Avonlea

8. “If it weren’t for her, there would never have been an empty space, or the need to fill it.”
—Nicole Krause, The History of Love

9. “He doesn’t want you to be real, and to think and to live. He doesn’t love you. But I love you. I want you to have your own thoughts and ideas and feelings, even when I hold you in my arms.”
—E. M. Forster, A Room With A View

10. “The more you love someone, he came to think, the harder it is to tell them. It surprised him that strangers didn’t stop each other on the street to say I love you.”

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Read more here: https://www.buzzfeed.com/most-romantic-lines-from-literature

 

Book Review: ‘The Rosie Effect’ by Graeme Simsion

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It was the debut novel that caught the attention of Bill Gates, who described The Rosie Project as ‘funny and profound’. As it spiralled into literary stardom, The Rosie Project found a place in our hearts.

As a rather obvious but nevertheless apt choice for a sequel, titled The Rosie Effect, Graeme Simsion revisits the lives of newlyweds Don and Rosie, who are now living in New York and working in the medical department of Columbia University.

You can read a review of the book by following this link: http://writersedit.com/rosie-effect-graeme-simsion-review/

Why must the ‘best new writers’ always be under 40?

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Do first-time writers have a sell-by date? You could be forgiven for thinking so. Buzzfeed posted a list of ’20 under 40 Debut Writers You Need To Be Reading’. And this is a great achievement for these authors.

But making a debut is a huge achievement at any stage in life, and it would be churlish not to celebrate all of them.

Follow the link for some thoughts on this topic, and a link to the original Buzzfeed article: https://www.theguardian.com/books/best-new-writers-always-under-40

17 Books That Should Be On Your Radar: March 2017

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Every month, the Writer’s Bone crew reviews or previews books they’ve read or want to read. This series may or may not also serve as a confessional for guilty pleasures and hipster novels only the brave would attempt. Here are their recommendations for March 2017:

Via http://www.writersbone.com/book-recommendations/2017/3/5/17-books-that-should-be-on-your-radar-march-2017