Writing Prompts: A Story After Sunrise

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Writing concisely is a great skill to have. It means you can connect with your readers in an instant rather than half a page, and that really packs a punch. But making the most meaning possible in the least amount of words can be very difficult. So, here’s a writing prompt to help you work on the weight of your words. Beware, this one is not for the faint-hearted!

Part 1: A story.

Write a short story starting with the sentence “We watched the sun rise”. It can be set anywhere, at any time, and be about whatever you want. Make it at least a page with as many details as you dare to think up.

Part 2: A paragraph.

Here’s where it gets tricky. Condense your story to a single paragraph. It may seem impossible to cut anything out, but you can do it. Think about what’s really important to your story and trim back the fat. We all have to ‘kill our darlings’!

Part 3: 25 words.

Turn your trimmed paragraph into (around) 25 words. Think about how can you merge multiple meanings into single words. This is where your vocabulary can come in handy. As long as you keep to ‘the point’ of your story you can whittle down your words and still get to the crux of what you want to say.

When you’re finished you should have three versions of the same story. This writing prompt is tough but totally worth it, because when you have your final sentences you’ll have some truly concentrated words and images. It also helps to see that your creative intentions don’t disappear with the words you cull, which makes it easier to write and edit your longer works. You can then apply this process to any novel or article you are writing and make your works concise.

Happy writing!

Via: https://writersedit.com/fiction-writing/writing-prompts/weekly-writing-prompts-12/

Writing Prompt: Christmas Acrostic

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OK, so unless you’ve been living under a rock in the outback with no internet connection, you can’t have failed to notice it’s getting close to Christmas.

If you’re anything like me you will have been fighting this whole festive thing since it started in September – I mean seriously, let’s at least enjoy celebrating Halloween properly before we even contemplate getting out the tinsel!

But now it is a mere few weeks away, perhaps it is time to really embrace the Christmas spirit – mince pies, fairy lights and all – so that you can enjoy it before it whooshes past in a whirlwind of wrapping paper, silver bows and baubles.

So with that in mind, your writing challenge should you choose to accept it is: Write a Christmas acrostic poem.

This is simple. Spell out the letters of C.h.r.i.s.t.m.a.s. down the left hand side of a page, and then write a verse for each line beginning with the appropriate letter. I first did this back in primary (elementary) school, and my Mum still gets it out every year now.

You don’t need to spend hours creating a masterpiece, although do that if you feel inspired, but just have fun with it. Enjoy the process of creating something festive. It might just get you into the Christmas mood. And who knows, if it’s really good, show your mum – she may just decide to get it out every year from now on, too! 🎄🎅🏻🎁

Via: https://www.bustle.com/p/25-writing-prompts

Writing Prompt: Spooky Story

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In the run up to Halloween, I will be doing some themed writing prompts; and without further ado here is today’s:

Write a spooky legend about your neighborhood.

Suburbia can be just as scary as the big city! What does it look like? Who lives there? What happened…?

Think Urban Legend or Scary Movie, make it as creepy as you like – but remember, you just made it up so don’t freak yourself out!

Via: https://www.bustle.com/writing-prompts-for-fall

Writing Prompt: School of Magic

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In the run up to Halloween, I will be doing some themed writing prompts; and without further ado here is today’s:

Design your very own school of magic!

What does it look like?

What subjects are taught?

Who are the teachers?

What’s the hot back-to-school gossip?

Anything goes, so have some fun with it…

Via: https://www.bustle.com/writing-prompts-for-fall

Writing Prompt: Spooky TV

Spooky TV

As we are heading towards Autumn/Fall and my preferred time of the year: Halloween, today’s writing prompt has that theme in mind.

Write a Halloween special for your favourite TV show. Whether it’s Gossip Girl, Games of Thrones or Eastenders – put these well loved characters into a spooky situation and then let your imagination run wild. Think Simpsons Halloween Special and have fun with it.

Go!

 

Writing Prompt: Opposites Attract

writing-prompts-Opposites attract

Characters come in many forms, and not all of them are happy protagonists who light up a room. Antagonists, villains, and grumpies may not be the most likeable characters but they’re still important to the story.

I was recently procrastinating writing a chapter from the perspective of my novel’s antagonist, purely because he was someone I wouldn’t get along with in real life. But once I started writing through their eyes I saw all their motivations and reasoning, and realised they weren’t so bad.

This writing prompt is about seeing through new perspectives and creating complex characters.

Create a Villain

Come up with a character that is so opposite to you that you couldn’t stand them if they were in the room with you. Give them beliefs that would get you into a heated debate, give them personality traits that would make you cringe, and a lifestyle that would make you sick. Go all out with this, and create the most horrible person that you can imagine.

Learn to Like Them

Jump into your character’s mind (this can be easier said than done) and find something about your character that gives a reason as to why they’re so villainous.

We all have experiences that shape us, so determine what life-changing experiences your character went through. Try and see how they justify their actions, and why they are perfectly reasonable from their perspective.

You might not necessarily ‘like’ them by the end of it, but you’ll certainly understand them much better.

Happy writing!

Via: https://writersedit.com/fiction-writing/writing-prompts