Writing Prompt: Spooky Story

writing prompt scary story

In the run up to Halloween, I will be doing some themed writing prompts; and without further ado here is today’s:

Write a spooky legend about your neighborhood.

Suburbia can be just as scary as the big city! What does it look like? Who lives there? What happened…?

Think Urban Legend or Scary Movie, make it as creepy as you like – but remember, you just made it up so don’t freak yourself out!

Via: https://www.bustle.com/writing-prompts-for-fall

Writing Prompt: School of Magic

writing-prompt-magic

In the run up to Halloween, I will be doing some themed writing prompts; and without further ado here is today’s:

Design your very own school of magic!

What does it look like?

What subjects are taught?

Who are the teachers?

What’s the hot back-to-school gossip?

Anything goes, so have some fun with it…

Via: https://www.bustle.com/writing-prompts-for-fall

Writing Prompt: Spooky TV

Spooky TV

As we are heading towards Autumn/Fall and my preferred time of the year: Halloween, today’s writing prompt has that theme in mind.

Write a Halloween special for your favourite TV show. Whether it’s Gossip Girl, Games of Thrones or Eastenders – put these well loved characters into a spooky situation and then let your imagination run wild. Think Simpsons Halloween Special and have fun with it.

Go!

 

Writing Prompt: Opposites Attract

writing-prompts-Opposites attract

Characters come in many forms, and not all of them are happy protagonists who light up a room. Antagonists, villains, and grumpies may not be the most likeable characters but they’re still important to the story.

I was recently procrastinating writing a chapter from the perspective of my novel’s antagonist, purely because he was someone I wouldn’t get along with in real life. But once I started writing through their eyes I saw all their motivations and reasoning, and realised they weren’t so bad.

This writing prompt is about seeing through new perspectives and creating complex characters.

Create a Villain

Come up with a character that is so opposite to you that you couldn’t stand them if they were in the room with you. Give them beliefs that would get you into a heated debate, give them personality traits that would make you cringe, and a lifestyle that would make you sick. Go all out with this, and create the most horrible person that you can imagine.

Learn to Like Them

Jump into your character’s mind (this can be easier said than done) and find something about your character that gives a reason as to why they’re so villainous.

We all have experiences that shape us, so determine what life-changing experiences your character went through. Try and see how they justify their actions, and why they are perfectly reasonable from their perspective.

You might not necessarily ‘like’ them by the end of it, but you’ll certainly understand them much better.

Happy writing!

Via: https://writersedit.com/fiction-writing/writing-prompts

Writing Prompt: Make a Brew!

writing-prompts-coffee-tea

You’ve probably heard the phrase, ‘actions speak louder than words’, and the age-old writing advice, ‘show, don’t tell’.

These ideas are based on using the subtext of the writing (what’s implied but not actually said) to communicate ideas without shoving them in the reader’s face.

Practice

Describe a couple’s argument using only the act of making a cup of coffee or tea. You can’t use dialogue and you can’t openly say that the characters have been fighting.

This writing prompt forces you to think about the way in which actions can tell a larger story, and uses subtlety to enrich your writing.

Good luck!

Via: https://writersedit.com/fiction-writing/writing-prompts

Writing Prompts: Write A Letter

Letter-Dream-meaning

Make a character write a letter. Not an email. Not a text message. An actual letter. 

Who’s this letter to? Does the letter explain your character’s relationship to its recipient? Does the reader already know the recipient? Or have you used this opportunity to introduce a new character?

What does the letter say? Do you, as the writer, include the letter in full? In snippets? Or do you simply paraphrase what your character is writing and thinking?

Some ideas: 

  • Your protagonist could write a letter to you, the author. What would they say to you? Would they be grateful, or would they have a few bones to pick?;
  • Your protagonist could write to another character or the antagonist;
  • Your antagonist could write you a letter, or write to the protagonist or another character, and so on;
  • The recipient of the letter could also write back.

Make sure that this letter offers your readers something new, what is it that we’re learning? Everything has to happen for a reason in your story, is this purely to show a character trait? Is it a clue as to what happens later? Is it to put new pressure on the relationship between your characters? 

Whatever motivates the letter, make sure you are discovering something deeper about the character or characters involved. 

Happy writing! 

Via: https://writersedit.com/254/resources-for-writers/weekly-writing-prompt-4/