The 2017 Baileys Prize Winner Is Revealed…

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We’re delighted to announce that this year’s Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction has been awarded to British author Naomi Alderman with her fourth novel The Power.

At an awards ceremony at the Royal Festival Hall, Southbank Centre, London – hosted by novelist and Prize Co-Founder, Kate Mosse – the 2017 Chair of Judges, Tessa Ross presented the author with the £30,000 prize and the ‘Bessie’, a limited edition bronze figurine. Both are anonymously endowed.

Tessa Ross, 2017 Chair of Judges, said: “The judges and I were thrilled to make this decision. We debated this wonderful shortlist for many hours but kept returning to Naomi Alderman’s brilliantly imagined dystopia – her big ideas and her fantastic imagination.”

Alderman’s win comes just over a decade after her debut novel Disobedience, won the 2006 Orange Award for New Writers. Set up in 2005,to mark the 10th anniversary of the Orange Prize*, the emphasis of the Award was on emerging talent and the evidence of future potential.

“Congratulations to Naomi Alderman – her winning novel The Power is a wonderful example of the exceptional writing the Prize champions, ” commented SylSaller, ChiefMarketingOfficer, Diageo“Baileys is enormously proud to partner with the Prize who have created an open platform for the sharpest, smartest, most compelling women’s writing in the English language.”

For a chance to win a copy of The Power, Naomi’s incredible Baileys Prize-winning novel, keep an eye on the @BaileysPrize Twitter and Instagram!

Plus read an extract of The Power here >

Via: http://www.womensprizeforfiction.co.uk/

A Room of One’s Own | Helen Scheuerer

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When Virginia Woolf wrote A Room of One’s Own she referred to not only the physical space a woman needs to write, but also the need for room in education and the literary world for female writers to overcome the patriarchal nature of society.

Though I dare to say we are in no shape to dismiss these matters just yet, I’m not about to embark upon dissecting the latter topic in this article. What I do wish to talk about, is the need any writer has (woman or man) for a physical work space to call their own.

Like many writers, I’ve lived and worked in some pretty cramped places; from an office that squeezed twenty writers around one trestle table (elbow-to-elbow) to a studio apartment shared with an equally hardworking partner.

I’ve certainly longed for the luxury of my own desk (let alone my own room). It’s because of these experiences over the past few years that I’ve come to realise the importance of having your own work space, whether it’s a coffee table in the corner of a tiny room or an actual office.

Writing is, for the most part, a solitary venture. We lock ourselves away in the world we are creating and don’t want to be disturbed.

Personally, I can’t stand the noise of the television blaring, or people clanging about downstairs unnecessarily, though over the years I’ve become better at tuning it out.

These intrusions usually serve as distractions from our craft, and there really is nothing worse, considering how many of us struggle to find time for it in the first place.

A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction.

Try and find yourself a little nook in the house where you can set yourself up a desk (it doesn’t have to be imposing). This desk should be yours and yours alone.

You should be free to leave your books open, your papers loose and your pen lidless, without the fear of having someone come along and moving things around.

Having this space is so important to your creative well being. It allows you to create routine, to stay focused and to have discipline. When you are sitting at your desk, there is only one thing you should be doing: writing.

Woolf said we needed money and a room of our own. I’d say that we need to get the room first (or at least the desk), and the money will come later. Hopefully.

Via: http://writersedit.com/room-ones-own/

The Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction Shortlist Books | Waterstones

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Presenting the Shortlist from the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction 2017

The Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction is the UK’s most prestigious annual book award for fiction written by a woman. Founded in 1996, the Prize has consistently delivered winners which have become a vital part of who Waterstones is as a bookseller, from titles of the power of Zadie Smith’s On Beauty in 2006 to last year’s victory of Lisa McInerney for The Glorious Heresies.

It’s a pleasure to present the shortlist for the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction 2017. Once again, the Baileys judging panel have selected an exquisite list of treasures.

You can find out more about each of these books, read their full synopsis and even purchase it if you like, by following this link: https://www.waterstones.com/book-awards/the-baileys-womens-prize-for-fiction

Revealing the Baileys Prize 2017 Shortlist

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REVEALING THE 2017 SHORTLIST…

We’re absolutely thrilled to reveal the 2017 Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction shortlist. This year’s six shortlisted books include one previous winner of the Prize and one debut novelist.

“It has been a great privilege to Chair the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction in a year which has proved exceptional for writing of both quality and originality,” said Tessa Ross, 2017 Chair of Judges. “It was therefore quite a challenge to whittle this fantastic longlist of 16 books down to only six… These were the six novels that stayed with all of us well beyond the final page.”

The shortlisted books are as follows:

Stay With Me by Ayọ̀bámi Adébáyọ̀̀
The Power  Naomi Alderman
The Dark Circle by Linda Grant
The Sport of Kings by C.E. Morgan
First Love by Gwendoline Riley
Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien

This year’s judges now have the unenviable task of choosing the winner from these six brilliant books, which will be revealed at an awards ceremony hosted in the Clore Ballroom at the Royal Festival Hall on 7 June 2017.

Keep tabs on all things Baileys by visiting the original article here:  http://www.womensprizeforfiction.co.uk/reading-room/news/revealing-2017-shortlist

Book Review: The Lonely Hearts Hotel | Heather O’Neill

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A detailed review by Naomi Frisby of The Lonely Hearts Hotel written by Heather O’Neill, which has been long-listed for the Baileys Prize – warning this review does contain spoilers, and by the sounds of the reactions of the Baileys Prize shadow panel, it’s a Marmite book – you will either love it or hate it.

Read more here and decide what you think: https://thewritesofwoman.wordpress.com/the-lonely-hearts-hotel-heather-oneill