How to find your own writing style 

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Tropes and cliches can be hard to avoid, especially when you’re working within specialized genres or categories. Tom Siddell, creator of the webcomic Gunnerkrigg Court, reminds us why it’s so important to write for yourself:

You have to hold your own interest first, otherwise you will never hold the interest of others.

http://blog.nanowrimo.org/post/149077594827/how-to-find-your-own-writing-style

How To Write A Novel According To Jane Austen

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There are few things that have stood the test of time like a Jane Austen novel.

It’s been more than 200 years since the beloved English novelist released new work yet her characters remain relevant, inspiring Hollywood movie adaptations, television series, critical essays and interpretations across multiple mediums.

Although Austen was never publicly acknowledged as a writer in her own lifetime, since her death she has become a literary icon with many Janeites wishing they could resurrect her from the dead, if only to get her take on the modern world.

What would she make of online dating? The rise of goth fiction? Equal pay? KIMYE?

With time travel not yet an option, author Rebecca Smith – who happens to be the five-times-great-niece of Austen herself has brought us (and aspiring writers the world over) the next best thing – a comprehensive guide to writing like Jane Austen.

via How To Write A Novel According To Jane Austen

7 Ways to Improve Your Writing, According to Experts | TIME

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Sometimes you don’t know what you want to say. Other times you don’t know the right way to say it. And very often you can’t get your butt in the chair to write anything at all.

Whether it’s reports and presentations for the office, that great novel you’d love to write, or the movie you can see in your head that hasn’t made its way to the page yet, you could definitely use some tips on how to improve your writing.

via 7 Ways to Improve Your Writing, According to Experts | TIME

Mâtowak: Woman Who Cries – Guest Post from Author Joylene Nowell Butler | The Book’s the Thing

A murder enveloped in pain and mystery… When Canada’s retired Minister of National Defense, Leland Warner, is murdered in his home, the case is handed to Corporal Danny Killian, an aboriginal man tortured by his wife’s unsolved murder. The suspect, 60-year-old Sally Warner, still grieves for the loss of her two sons, dead in a suicide/murder eighteen months earlier…

via Mâtowak: Woman Who Cries – Guest Post from Author Joylene Nowell Butler — The Book’s the Thing

Writing: Setting Good Creative Habits

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It’s all well and good thinking about creative writing and knowing you’ll feel better if you sit down and do it, but sometimes you need a little push in the right direction to form good creative habits. The tips discussed in the following Go Creative! broadcast are simple to follow and easy to master. Click the link to find out how…

Via http://selfpublishingadvice.org/writing-setting-good-creative-habits-from-orna-rosss-go-creative-show/

Eastern Teaching: Great Writing comes from the Heart

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Great literary works can evoke a multitude of emotions, yet can also nourish people’s hearts. But how does one create great books or articles? And how does a writer find the inspiration to create them?

To find the answers to these questions, we asked Chinese-language columnist Wang Guanming from Epoch Times who began writing for the newspaper and the web in December 2005. Wang Guanming has much to say about the journey toward better writing.

Via http://www.visiontimes.com/2016/11/03/great-writing-comes-from-the-heart.html

Jo Cannon: The Person I Became (or What I’ve Really Learned Since Being Published)

 

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Photographed by Philippa Gedge

If you attend enough events as an author, you will find you are asked the same questions many times over. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, because with each response, you are able to fine tune your answers.

‘Are you a goat, or a sheep?’

‘Yes, but where did Mrs Creasy really go?’

‘What have you learned since you’ve been published?’

What have I learned since I’ve been published? I will usually answer, ‘the toilets at Euston Station only take ten and twenty pence pieces,’ and ‘Salisbury is a lot further away than you think.’ The truth is, I have learned more in the last twelve months than I could ever have imagined possible, and (in my current state of editing limbo), I thought I’d take a moment to explain why…

Via: https://joannacannon.com/2016/11/04/the-person-i-became-or-what-ive-really-learned-since-being-published/